51 Most Incredible German Scientists and Innovators of All Times


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31. Otto Fritz Meyerhof (1884 – 1951)

Otto Fritz Meyerhof

Otto Fritz Meyerhof revealed through his research the hidden truths about the biochemical reactions that occur in the metabolic system of muscles, through the analysis of glycogen-lactic cycle. Therefore, he remains the main contributor on understanding the causes of muscle reactions.

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32. Otto Hahn (1879 – 1968)

Otto HahnOtto Hahn gets the merits for inventing the nuclear fission. He also isolated protactinium-231, an isotope of protactinium.

As a contributor to the development of atomic bomb, he became very affected by the news of atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima (1945).
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33. Otto Stern (1888 – 1969)

Otto_Stern Otto Stern is recognized for his dedicated work in evolving molecular beam, which helps on analyzing molecules characteristics and size during the magnetic moment of proton.

He was forced to leave Germany upon the Nazi regime empowerment, migrating in United States – latter to become research professor of physics in an American renowned research institute.

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34. Paul Ehrlich (1854 –1915)

Paul Ehrlich

Ehrlich is historically distinguished for his dedicated exploration in hematology, immunology and chemotherapy and especially for launching the treatment formula for the disease of syphilis.

He was known also for promoting magic bullet concept that helped to the invention of antiserum for battling diphtheria as well as for standardizing therapeutic serums.

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35. Peter Grünberg (1939)

Peter Grünberg
Grünberg became a recognized figure in science of physics for his great co-detection of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect.

His discovery, as explaining that by changing magnetization direction the resistance can be reduced or enlarged, found a wide application in the dimensions of magnetic storage devices (i.e. hard drives of computers).

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